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Themes in Narrative

CWL 441

Analysis of literary themes and types in narratives of Western and non-Western literature (e.g., the hero, east and west, dream visions), emphasizing comparative perspectives. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 undergraduate hours or 12 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One year of college literature or consent of instructor.

66830
Freaks, Monsters, and Nonconforming Bodies in Literature and Popular Culture This course asks us to consider what it means to inhabit a particular body, to face the possibilities and the limits of physical existence, and to analyze the ways in which those physical bodies may act as vehicles for or sites of resistance to authority or hegemony. Doing so also requires an exploration of the media used to represent these bodies, especially those spaces in which bodies can be larger than life, prettified, or rendered grotesque. Over the course of the semester, students will engage with questions like: how is the physical body represented differently in film, text, and visual materials? How do these representations change over genres and national contexts? How are bodies constructed as narrative vehicles, or as spaces on which stories are written? What alternatives to the dominance of “the normal” do these bodies present?

66829
Freaks, Monsters, and Nonconforming Bodies in Literature and Popular Culture This course asks us to consider what it means to inhabit a particular body, to face the possibilities and the limits of physical existence, and to analyze the ways in which those physical bodies may act as vehicles for or sites of resistance to authority or hegemony. Doing so also requires an exploration of the media used to represent these bodies, especially those spaces in which bodies can be larger than life, prettified, or rendered grotesque. Over the course of the semester, students will engage with questions like: how is the physical body represented differently in film, text, and visual materials? How do these representations change over genres and national contexts? How are bodies constructed as narrative vehicles, or as spaces on which stories are written? What alternatives to the dominance of “the normal” do these bodies present?